Waimate Museum and Archives films to digitize

Waimate Museum archivist Sue Hanham said the films to be digitized date from the 1950s to the 1970s.

JOHN BISSET / Stuff

Waimate Museum archivist Sue Hanham said the films to be digitized date from the 1950s to the 1970s.

Home video footage showing Waimate from the 1950s to the 1970s will soon be digitized.

The $ 1,244 project to digitize and store the over 100 eight-millimeter and super 8-millimeter in the Waimate Museum and Archives collection received $ 622 through a heritage grant from the Waimate District Council.

The app, made by museum archivist Sue Hanham on behalf of the Waimate Historical Society, aims to “make the collections accessible to a wide range of current and future users.”

The request was heard at the council meeting last Tuesday.

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Hanham said The Timaru Herald film reels came from a “variety of sources” and some films were over 70 years old.

“Most of the reels are home movies taken by people with their personal cameras. We have films from the 1950s to the 1970s, ”Hanham said.

“There is a wide variety of film content like street parades, home movies, local events, and other events in Waimate.”

It was important that the analogue audiovisual collection be neat because it risked “degrading due to the fragility of the medium and the obsolescence of the material to play this medium,” she said.

“There is a consensus among audiovisual archives internationally that tapes / films that are not digitized by 2025, we stand to lose forever.

“This creates a deadline and a dilemma for the Waimate Museum and Archives tasked with caring for these precious memories within the audiovisual collection.

“Preservation digitization reduces physical wear and tear on fragile archives and is an effective tool for preserving archives that risk being lost if stored on unstable media or subject to technological obsolescence.

Hanham said the analogue audiovisual collection is threatened with

JOHN BISSET / Stuff

Hanham said the analogue audiovisual collection is threatened with “degradation due to the fragility of the medium and the obsolescence of the equipment to play this medium”.

Hanham said the project will allow wider access to the collection through a variety of mediums such as exhibitions, film screenings and for research.

“The films will provide access to a new and diverse audience and stimulate dialogue with the community and visitors to Waimate.

“Preservation is access. If we do not archive our collection, we are unable to provide access. Getting information back to our community is an important part of the job, and the success of archives depends more on what we give back to the community than what we keep.

“This type of productivity is self-sufficient. The more we return to our community, the more they value what we do. “

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