Stockton’s Chicano Research Center provides information on Latino heritage

Hispanic Heritage Month is in full swing, and KCRA 3 takes a closer look at the contributions of Latinos to the United States. Richard Soto is a Vietnam veteran on a mission to promote literacy with his one-of-a-kind library in the heart of Stockton. He says he is also living his dream as the founder of the Chicano Research Center. Ever since he was a child, Soto said he always sought out books that would tell him more about his Latino heritage. “I just want to know my story,” Soto said when asked what sparked his interest. he can count. It was a long journey for Soto. He has been collecting books since returning from Vietnam in 1968 and has no plans to slow down. Every page in its hub highlights literature for — and by — Latinos. . This turns out to be a goldmine of information.” I’ve had several people working on their PhDs, and they can’t find a Chicano book, so they call, and I say, ‘Oh yeah, we we got it.’ I brought in a lady from Texas,” Soto said, with a smile. Soto loves that people often come to the Chicano Cultural Center in Stockton to borrow and read his books. “I’m going to bring people up and say, ‘Do you have this book? And I’ll say, ‘We have two sets,'” Soto said. He said it was good for Latinos of all ages to learn their history and to be proud of the many contributions made to the United States.” People are so used to not seeing us anywhere that they just believe there is nothing about us. It helps with self-esteem. People are proud that we did something,” Soto said. Teresa Sicaeros, a retired elementary school teacher, discovered Soto’s mission and began volunteering at the center. and to open up the world and show people that there are all kinds of literature,” Sicaeros said. “Me being part of a generation with which books were not available, may I say our faces, and so these young children, see their faces. Their self-esteem grows because they realize that it there are other people, their culture is something wonderful, and literacy shows them their life,” Sicaeros said. She added that the center is transformational for children. “They will progress and get an education. They will go to college. They will get their bachelor’s or master’s degrees and become astronauts and even the president,” said Sicaeros. These Stockton Literacy Ambassadors are calling on major publishers to start to produce more books featuring Latinos. continue to provide free resources. “Please understand that Latinos read. Yes, we use the media and we use our phones, but we love to read. We really do and we learn from what we read,” Sicaeros said. The Research Center is located at 415 E. Main Street in Stockton. may also donate Latin literature to the library collection.

Hispanic Heritage Month is in full swing, and KCRA 3 takes a closer look at the contributions of Latinos to the United States.

Richard Soto is a Vietnam veteran on a mission to promote literacy with his one-of-a-kind library in the heart of Stockton.

He says he is also living his dream as the founder of the Chicano Research Center.

Ever since he was a child, Soto said he always sought out books that would tell him more about his Latino heritage.

“I just want to know my story,” Soto said when asked what sparked his interest.

Now Grandpa, he has more books than he can count.

It’s been a long journey for Soto. He has been collecting books since returning from Vietnam in 1968 and has no intention of slowing down.

Each page at its center highlights literature for – and by – Latinos.

“We probably have one of the best Pancho Villa collections,” Soto said.

It turns out to be a gold mine full of information.

“I’ve had several people working on their PhDs, and they can’t find a Chicano book, so they call, and I’m like, ‘Oh yeah, we got it.’ I brought in a lady from Texas,” Soto said, with a smile.

Soto likes that people often come to the Chicano Cultural Center in Stockton to borrow and read his books.

“I’m going to ask people to come in and say, ‘Do you have that book?’ And I’ll say, ‘We have two sets,'” Soto said.

He said it was good for Latinos of all ages to learn their history and be proud of the many contributions made to the United States.

“People are so used to not seeing us anywhere that they just believe there’s nothing about us. It helps with self-esteem. People are proud that we’ve done something thing,” Soto said.

Teresa Sicaeros, a retired elementary school teacher, discovered Soto’s mission and began volunteering at the center.

“What that means to me is the total passion of a person who believed in a dream, and the dream was to be an advocate for literacy – and to open up the world and show people that ‘There are all kinds of literature,’ said Sicaéros.

The Chicano Research Center offers a wide range of children’s books to get little ones hooked on reading.

“Me being part of a generation with which books were not available, may I say our faces, and so these young children, see their faces. Their self-esteem grows because they realize that it there are other people, their culture is something wonderful, and literacy shows them their life,” Sicaeros said.

She added that the center is transformational for children.

“They will progress and get an education. They will go to college. They will get their bachelor’s or master’s degree and become astronauts and even president,” Sicaeros said.

These Stockton Literacy Ambassadors are calling on major publishers to start producing more books featuring Latinos.

Soto and Sicaeros said there’s still a long way to go, but the Chicano Cultural Center plans to continue providing free resources.

“Please understand that Latinos read. Yes, we use the media and we use our phones, but we love to read. We really do and we learn from what we read,” Sicaeros said.

The Chicano Research Center is located at 415 E. Main Street in Stockton.

The community can browse books and view historical artwork, and the community can also donate Latin literature to the library’s collection.

About Elaine Morales

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