Fort Hood Podcast Reaches Milestone of the Century | Item





The Great Big Podcast of Fort Hood co-hosts SPC. Garrett Dacko and Cpl. Kyra Pearl, both from the 11th Corps Signals Brigade, interviews guests of the podcast while the show’s producer and co-host Samantha Farlow checks audio levels during a recording session at Fort Hood , Texas, December 6. On December 2, the podcast aired its 100th episode.
(Photo credit: Blair Dupre, Fort Hood Public Affairs)

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FORT HOOD, Texas – When the Dec. 2 episode of the Fort Hood Great Big Podcast went live, featuring professionals at the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Women’s Health Center, followed by a movie and book review he did more than just try to educate and entertain this Texas hub. military community.

He has taken an important step.

This show, co-hosted and produced by Samantha Farlow of the Fort Hood Public Affairs Office, was the 100th episode of the show. Farlow, who started co-hosting the weekly podcast in June and taking on a producer role in September, said producing the weekly show was one of the highlights of her work week. Hitting the mark of the century had her beaming.

“It’s magic,” said Farlow, who is also social media manager and webmaster for US Army Garrison – Fort Hood. “Fort Hood is so big and full of so many stories to tell. We are by no means experts in this matter, but as we learn more it is great to pass this on to our community.

His co-hosts for this landmark episode were a pair of soldiers from the 11th Corps Signals Brigade: Spc. Garrett Dacko and newly promoted Cpl. Kyra Pearl. Pearl recently re-enlisted to change her military occupation specialty from Signal Corps to Public Affairs. She will begin her formal training at the Defense Information School in Fort Meade, Md., In March.

“It gave me work experience and confidence in my abilities,” Pearl said. “You can talk to so many people. It is an incredible practice. Once I realized I knew what I was doing, I knew I wanted to do it forever.

The current cast of co-hosts, all millennials in their twenties, are much younger than the original team that launched the podcast on December 16, 2019. The dynamic was then a millennial (so -Spc. Brianna Doo), a Gen-Xer (producer Charlie Maib) and even a Baby Boomer (Command Information Officer Dave Larsen), but the intention was the same: to inform and entertain… in a unique way.

“I grew up listening to talk radio, not podcasts. Podcasts did not exist then. So my concept of what a podcast should look like was much closer to the classic radio format, minus callers, of course, ”Maib said. “If we could have incorporated callers into the mix, I would have loved it! I took the time to listen to what the other military podcasts sounded like and found them very dry. This reinforced my decision to go ahead with a more flexible “talk-radio” style format. “

Maib left the show when he moved to a new public affairs position with the United States Corps of Engineers at Camp Zama, Japan in November 2020. Larsen walked away from the microphone in mid -June, and Sgt. Brianna Doo left at the end of October… recording her last episode on her last day in the army.


First episode



Can SPC. Brianna Doo, 1st Cavalry Division Band, discusses the news with Charlie Maib during the recording session of the first episode of the Great Big Podcast of Fort Hood in December 2019 inside the podcast studio of the Public Affairs office of Fort Hood in Fort Hood, Texas. Sgt. Doo was the last of the three original co-hosts to appear on the show.
(Photo credit: Dave Larsen, Fort Hood Public Affairs)

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“It was important (to me) because it was the highlight of my service in public affairs and with the military in general,” said Sgt. Doo, who recently retired from the 1st Cavalry Division Marching Band, said. “I wanted to go out and do something I loved and work on it for as long as possible.”

“I’m proud of the work the original team did on the series, but I’m just as proud that Sam and the new team have taken what we’ve created and made it their own,” said Maib. “I think it’s great that they have a vision and aren’t afraid to make it happen. I’m just honored that they’ve all been such good stewards to see this up to 100 episodes.

Over the course of its two years, in addition to helping keep the community informed of events, programs and activities, Fort Hood’s Great Big Podcast has touched on many sensitive topics, from the start of the pandemic to the disappearance of the soldiers from Fort Hood, suicide prevention, sexual harassment and assault prevention and the III Corps’ efforts to instill a “People First” culture in all of its formations.

“It’s important that senior leaders use a variety of communication methods, like podcasting, to reach a variety of audiences,” said Tom Rheinlander, director of Fort Hood Public Affairs. “It’s about transparency, discussing topics that make you think about yourself, your teammates and our military community as a whole. We will continue to do so.


Happy Holidays



The original co-hosts of the Great Big Podcast of Fort Hood – then-Spc. Brianna Doo of the 1st Cavalry Division Group, Charlie Maib and Dave Larsen, both of the Fort Hood Public Affairs Office – clown for a greeting photoshoot in Fort Hood, TX shortly after the broadcast from the first podcast online on December 16, 2019.
(Photo credit: Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs)

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“I can’t wait,” Maib added, “to hear what the next 100 episodes have in store for us!”

“Lots of valuable information and a lot more laughs,” Farlow promised, “as we continue to try and keep people entertained on Thursdays. Hopefully (we’re telling) more stories about the amazing soldiers stationed here at Fort Hood and the many services and programs we provide to them and their families.

The podcast airs online every Thursday morning at midnight at www.thegreatbigpodcast.com. A link to the show is also available on the facility’s home page, www.home.army.mil/hood.

About Elaine Morales

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