Congressman Yarmuth Announces Funding of Over $ 500,000 for 3 Louisville Institutions

Congressman John Yarmuth announced that more than $ 500,000 will be awarded to three Louisville institutions as part of the US bailout, his office said. for cultural organizations and educational institutions affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Kentucky Science Center, the Frazier History Museum, and the Filson Historical Society will be awarded the National Endowment for Humanities. “The pandemic has caused so much upheaval in our country, but shutting down the doors of our museums and other educational and cultural institutions for so long has dealt a serious blow not only to the education and education of the American people, but to the survival. of these institutions themselves, “Yarmuth said.” This is why we designed the American bailout in a way that ensured that these cultural centers were not forgotten, and why I am so proud that three pil lars from our community will receive this funding. ”Yarmuth went on to describe how these investments will be used, including retaining and hiring staff, delivering new programs and creating new experiences for everyone to enjoy. as their doors reopen and more people will be safe.back.The funding will allow the Kentucky Science Center to bring the next phase of their new health experience to life and humanity on the third floor, “Uniquely Human”. The Frazier History Museum is planning a new permanent exhibit The Commonwealth: Divided We Fall that will focus on inclusive individual accounts of lesser-known figures in Kentucky history. The exhibit aims to tell the stories of various Kentuckians so that all visitors, regardless of their background, can see themselves in Kentucky history. The Filson Historical Society’s project will resurrect the Library of Congress’s old American memory project, “First American West, The Ohio River Valley, 1750-1820.” “This project allows us to reflect on two important eras, the period of settler conflict that brought European, Indigenous and African peoples and ideas to Kentucky and the early experiments in digital technology to enable people to engage with the past. in new ways, “said Patrick Lewis, director of collections and research at Filson.” I look forward to interesting conversations about what increased representation, inclusion and access to historical archives can mean for our society today and in the future. ”

Congressman John Yarmuth announced that more than $ 500,000 will be awarded to three Louisville institutions as part of the US bailout, his office said.

The funding is part of the $ 135 million allocated by Congress in the US bailout, legislation led by Congress by Yarmuth, for cultural organizations and educational institutions affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Kentucky Science Center, the Frazier History Museum, and the Filson Historical Society will be awarded the National Endowment for Humanities.

“The pandemic has upset our country so much, but shutting the doors of our museums and other educational and cultural institutions for so long has dealt a serious blow not only to the education and education of the American people, but to the survival of these institutions themselves, ”Yarmuth said.

“This is why we designed the American bailout so that these cultural centers are not forgotten, and why I am so proud that three pillars of our community are receiving this funding.”

Yarmuth went on to describe how these investments will be leveraged, including retaining and hiring staff, offering new programs, and creating new experiences for everyone to enjoy as their doors reopen and more people return. safely.

The funding will allow the Kentucky Science Center to bring the next phase of their new health and humanity experience to life on the third floor, Uniquely Human. “

The Frazier History Museum is planning a new permanent exhibit The Commonwealth: Divided We Fall that will focus on the inclusive individual accounts of lesser-known figures in Kentucky history. The exhibit aims to tell the stories of various Kentuckians so that all visitors, regardless of their background, can see themselves in Kentucky history.

The Filson Historical Society project will resurrect the Library of Congress’s old American memory project, “First American West, the Ohio River Valley, 1750-1820”.

“This project allows us to reflect on two important eras, the period of conflict between settlers that brought European, Indigenous and African peoples and ideas to Kentucky and the early experiments with digital technology to enable people to approach the past. in new ways, ”said Patrick Lewis, director of collections and research at Filson. “I look forward to interesting conversations about what increased representation, inclusion and access to historical archives can mean for our society today and in the future.”

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